The National World War Two Museum


The National WW2 Museum
A great museum and tribute to those who served

In the heart of New Orleans, Louisiana is The National World War Two Museum of the United States. This city is home to the museum because the then President Eisenhower (also the General in charge of the June 6th, 1944 D-Day invasion in Europe during World War Two) named Dr. Stephen Higgins the man who helped win the war. His ship building company designed the Higgins Landing Craft that facilitated seaborne invasions and in 1943 92% of the US Navy consisted of ships and boats designed by Higgins Industries, of which many were built at one of their 7 plants located in New Orleans. It was a very important company and city to the war effort.

Higgins Landing Craft National WW2 Museum New Orleans
Higgins Landing Craft
The C-47 was an integral part of the D-Day airborne invasion of 1944
The C-47 was also an integral part of the D-Day airborne invasion of 1944
C-47 Dakota/Skytrain
C-47 Dakota/Skytrain

The industrial might of the U.S. was the difference that helped win World War Two. Displayed throughout the museum are the vehicles and weapons that were mass-produced in US factories and were so important to the Allied war effort.

M4 Sherman tank - the mainstay medium tank of the US Army New Orleans WW2
M4 Sherman tank – the mainstay medium tank of the US Army in WW2
Willys Jeep and light weight artillery and anti-tank guns that were perfect for airborne and sea landings WW2
Willys Jeep and light weight artillery and anti-tank guns that were perfect for airborne and sea landings
Willys Jeep
Willys Jeep
Ford GPA Amphibian The National WW2 Museum New Orleans USA
Ford GPA Amphibian
M4A3 Sherman birds eye view National WW2 Museum New Orleans
M4A3 Sherman birds eye view
German DKW NZ350
German DKW NZ350
US Army Harley Davidson
US Army Harley Davidson
German individual bomb shelter used at industrial sites during WW2 National Museum of WW2 New Orleans
German individual bomb shelter used at industrial sites during WW2

Don’t miss the Bob Hope section of the museum. Apart from being a hilarious and great actor and comedian he dedicated almost 50 years to entertaining the troops on USO tours from World War Two through to Operation Desert Shield (1941-1990). His support to those in service on the front lines was recognized in 1997 when Congress designated him the first honorary veteran of the U.S. armed forces. Quite the honour!

Bob Hope - An American Treasure National WW2 Museum New Orleans
Bob Hope – An American Treasure
USO tour Bob Hope  (May 29th, 1903 – July 27th, 2003)
Bob Hope (May 29th, 1903 – July 27th, 2003)
Bobe Hope USO Memorabilia
Bobe Hope USO Memorabilia
Bob Hope on a USO Tour
Bob Hope on a USO Tour

In addition to being a fantastic collection of historical artifacts and weaponry, the museum has one of the most impressively displayed aviation collections you will see. The aircraft are suspended from the ceilings of the various buildings but you don’t just look up at them. You can go many stories high and see the aircraft at and above the level they are displayed at.

The US Freedom Pavilion: The Boeing Centre National WW2 Museum New Orleans
The US Freedom Pavilion: The Boeing Centre
The National WW2 Museum New Orleans
What a display!

The design of the galleries gives you a unique opportunity to take a look at some of the most important US aircraft of World War Two from all angles, top to bottom. Standing high up above a Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress in the The US Freedom Pavilion: The Boeing Centre is something you can’t do everyday!

B-17E Flying Fortress My Gal Sal National WW2 Museum New Orleans
B-17E “My Gal Sal” was abandoned in Greenland in 1942 after an emergency landing. 53 years later she was returned to the US. After a further 5 years, restoration began in 2000 in Ohio and was completed in 2012 for display in the Museums new wing in 2013
B-17E "My Gal Sal"
B-17E “My Gal Sal” heavy bomber – quite the view from up there
USAAF North American P-51D Mustang
USAAF North American P-51D Mustang – protector of the B-17
USAAF North American P-51D Mustang National WW2 Museum New Orleans
Top down view of the Mustang
North American B-25 Mitchell National WW2 Museum New Orleans Louisiana USA
North American B-25 Mitchell medium bomber
Consolidated B-24 Liberator heavy bomber
Consolidated B-24 Liberator heavy bomber
P-51D and B-17 National WW2 Museum New Orleans Louisiana
Big Brother and Little Brother

Aircraft on display include those used by the US Army Air Force (USAAF) and US Navy. There is also a British Supermarine Spitfire Mk.Vb in the D-Day gallery.

US Navy Vought F4U Corsair National WW2 Museum
US Navy Vought F4U Corsair
USN Grumman TBM Avenger torpedo bomber
USN Grumman TBM Avenger torpedo bomber
US Navy Douglas Dauntless dive bomber
US Navy Douglas Dauntless dive bomber
Douglas Dauntless National WW2 Museum New Orleans
Top down view of the Dauntless
Corsair Dauntless National World War Two Museum New Orleans
Fleet defenders
Vought F4U Corsair Whistling Death
Vought F4U Corsair the nemesis of the Japanese who knew it as “Whistling Death”
Supermarine Spitfire Mk.Vb National WW2 Museum New Orleans
Supermarine Spitfire Mk.Vb

The aircraft on display while I was at the museum are from the Allied side of things but I noticed in the new section of the museum called Campaigns of Courage: European and Pacific Theatres which was still under construction during my visit, that they had a later model German Messerschmitt Bf-109 being readied for display (it was mostly under a tarp but there as no mistaking that familiar shape). I guess that will be an expansion of the air war over Europe and a good reason to go back and visit the museum again some day.

German 88mm flak gun
The dreaded German 88mm flak gun
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6 Comments Add yours

  1. gpcox says:

    This place is definitely on my bucket list! Thanks for the preview, do you also get their newsletter?

    1. Deano says:

      You would really enjoy it. It has expanded since I was there too of course. I dont get their newsletter. I should sign up

  2. Mustang.Koji says:

    Industrial might helped win the war is a slight understatement. 🙂 For instance, after Midway, we had but one operational carrier in the Pacific. By the time of the Battle of Leyte Gulf, we had 34 carriers (jeep and escorts included) just at that battle. Incredible.

    1. Deano says:

      True. The production figures are astounding but ultimately in conjunction with industrial might and technology, it was good old boots on the ground, pilots, aircrews, ground crews, sailors, tankers etc. that won it.

  3. a gray says:

    When you go there, take enough time to really enjoy the museum. It’s definitely worthwhile. I was by in January.

    1. Deano says:

      Yes very much so. I literally spent the whole day there!

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